Tag Archives: Time

Haven Editorial: Fishy Game Fishing

There is something fishy about fishing fish in games. I have done it, you have done it. We as gamer’s have all been exposed to it at some point. I’ve tried a lot of games in my time and these pesky reward riddled mini games shows up all over the map. That being said, let’s take a closer look at some of these and see how various developers handled it and if the price was worth it.

Stardew Valley has a fairly decent and robust one. Which is also annoying as all hell. A town fellow hands you his old bamboo rod and leave the rest up to you. Equip some bait, apply force and throw the line into water. Wait for a bite and start reeling in, by tapping the button just fast enough to keep that fish inside the slider. Every now and then extra treasure appears as well. Yes it is definitely worth it.

Final Fantasy 15 and the boy band road trip also features one. Because why not flesh out Noctis skill set with something useful. Equip a rod, put on an alluring lure and make sure the fishing line has durability left. It’s one of those where the lure will be lost when the line snaps. Once the proper preparations has been completed, all I have to do is to aim at some fish silhouettes and let it go. Press the key a couple of times until one of the little buggers bite. Getting it to shore is then all about moving my rod in the same direction as the fish, whilst reeling in and reap the rewards of a new recipe.

The one in Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of time is my favorite one and no other game on this list comes close to that. Even if it resembles the one in Final Fantasy. Some desperate dude has a shop in the middle of Hyrule with Link as his only customer. I just have to pay the price, run around the place and pick a spot. Make some movement with the rod to attract a fish. Reel it in and move the stick a little to the left, to the right and backwards. Combined with a very dramatic camera made for quite an experience. Then turn in the biggest runt for a piece of heart. Or just find that hidden lure and go for that unique and very hard to get fish, which randomly appears. Only to get some extra dialogue for the trouble. Hylian Loach I believe its called.

Breath of fire 2 did it in a very annoying way, I dare say. I throw the line in and press a while hoping one of the fish is close enough to see  it and then bite. The problem is that I suffer from a limited amount of times I can press the key. Especially tricky with a treasure chest, since it will sink, resulting in a precise button timing challenge.

Pokemon has always been very simple in the approach. I place myself next to the water, hit a and wait for an exclamation mark before I click again. At lest you’ll never get a worm waterlogged boot on the hook.

World of Warcraft does it much the same way, but I have to actually click on the lure when things bite. Such as highly aggressive wagon wheels.

Meanwhile Black Desert made it into a directional key input challenge when I reacted to the prompt. Or I could just ignore it completely and let the game do the job for me, when I logged out. Yes almost every skill in the game can be set to afk farming.

All I’m saying is that some games does it well, whilst other botch up the mechanics and make the mini game boring.
That’s just several existing examples I can recall. Since I don’t play fishing simulators.

Early Access: Avalon Lords: Dawn Rises

20160530112031_1 Avalon Lords: Dawn Rises is a multiplayer-only, real time strategy (RTS) game in Early Access. When I say multiplayer, only I mean that there is no single player story mode. There are only single player practice rounds. At the start of the game you choose one of five factions to join, each of which gives you a slight bonus to things like starting gold and reduced resource requirements for certain units. From here you can play three separate types of games:

1. Empire: This is the largest. It pits you against other players or AI for control of the world. You battle over different regions in the name of your faction. There are a lot of teams on the board and this game can take a while to play through.
2. Conquest: This is the standard match. You start with a castle and a few peasants who can build or harvest for you. You slowly build an army and take on other players or AI in practice.
3. Battle: You create an army list by choosing from several units, then you just send your army after your opponents.

20160530111517_1

Playing against the AI is a huge pain in the ass, especially for someone who has rarely played RTS games. The AI builds much faster and more efficiently than you do. It can create huge armies very quickly and wipe you out by the time you create your first few units. I’m sure someone with much more experience in this genre could deal with the enemy a lot easier. However, since there is no way to change the AI difficulty, new players are for the most part shut out pretty early on. Playing the practice modes was about as much as I was able to do. Every time I tried to get into a human match the game reminded me that there were only 4 people playing. I waited in a queue for a while but was eventually unable to find a game.

In terms of game play, there really isn’t anything new or interesting here. Everything Avalon Lords does has been done already (and much, much better). The tech progression is fairly bog standard. You build buildings to get different units. You upgrade those buildings to get better units. You can build places that will research buffs for your units, or what have you. You have a central focus on gaining resources like iron, gold or wood with peasants in order to build. There’s really nothing in this game that you wouldn’t find in any other RTS. On top of that, the generic medieval theme has been done to death.20160531112829_1

The controls are finicky and unpleasant when you try to drag over a bunch of units to select them, or try to move the map to get to where you want. You sometimes end up on the complete opposite side of the map from where you intended. The developers have recently announced that they are making the game free-to-play. So in the future be wary of this game not only being out-shined by other RTS games (including many free ones), but also being filled with micro-transactions. This is speculation, so we’ll just have to see.

The most fun I had with Avalon Lords are the short battle games. Here you just choose units for your roster and send them out against your opponent. I found it was best to send them all in one large clump, since that’s mostly what your opponent will being doing. Here you just watch them all fight and die. Then the game ends, nice and simple. No resource management or building nonsense; just a quick fight. You can choose the configuration of your list so that you can have all archers or crossbowmen, or all weak sword guys, or heavy shielded guys…or any combination thereof. It’s over in under five minutes, and then you can do something else with your time.

20160530110808_1

-Jordan Kamm-

Haven Review: Guilty Gear 2 -OVERTURE-

header
Meth: it’s a hell of a drug. It can mess people up in the head and it’s why I assume the developers thought making
an open combat game from the Guilty Gear series was a good idea. But all jokes aside, the game is notoriously bad. When you start playing a Guilty Gear title you expect a nice fighting game where you can battle your opponents and friends.    But this title makes you say “what the hell” with its real time strategy style combat and giving Sol Badguy various abilities he has never had before. It also aims to tie all the canon main fighting characters into a single game. Its first initial goal is to literally confuse the players by explaining how magic works.

But I digress. As I start playing the game it introduces the mechanics to me slowly in a almost never ending barrage of tutorial missions. Once you think you have finished one, you are stuck yet again doing more and more; and I use the term “mission” loosely. A typical mission will have a start and stop to it. The missions in this game start but are soon followed by several other baby missions until the overall mission is completed.guilty-gear-2-overture-1254403743

The game comes across as a jumped mess of things, with elements from various genres, including MOBA and RTS. These are combined with a Hack’n’Slash that you would expect to see in a Dynasty Warriors title. Some of the elements work while the others are an utter disappointment. The overall game feels like it is just trying too hard to reinvigorate a game series that isn’t known as well as Street Fighter.

This all leads me to beg with the developers and plead and say “Stop, please, drugs are bad, stop taking Meth or whatever you are taking to think this game is good”. The game’s controls are possibly one of the worst, and for a good while I was just trying to figure out how to run in a stage. But it doesn’t teach you until roughly the eighth tutorial mission. For anyone who is wondering, it’s R3 on the controller. God have mercy on you if you’re using a keyboard.gg_overture2

Now the overall plot to each stage is to take over tiny little magical tower things by attacking them and bringing your troops over so you can produce more troops and clear the areas. Its easy enough, considering the Hack’n’slash of the game gives you the ability to kill a lot of things with ease. The boss fights remain a total bore and are some of the worst I have ever played in a game to date. So is a lot of the corny dialog and the lip-syncing to the characters, although it’s what to expect with little love given to a port of a game. They must not have had a lot of hope for the game selling well in the Western and European markets.gg_overture4

The overall design of the stages don’t really stand out to me in a good way either. You get to see a fully rendered Sol Badguy, Ky and the rest, but when you look at the background it feels as if they took stock assets from other titles or developers and threw them in there with warped buildings that remain unexplained in the game’s narrative. The only real saving grace of the game is the music and just how well the actual cut-scenes are done. But even then it’s not good enough for us to merit this game being good.

The controls are sluggish, the music is alright, the cut-scenes are good, the design overall is poor and it’s filled with enough tutorials to make anyone rage. But hey, if you actually read all this and you still think it’s good, then by all means go and buy it! I won’t condemn you. It is your money after all!

-Daniel Clatworthy-
Overture2