Tag Archives: game mechanics

Haven Editorial: Fishy Game Fishing

There is something fishy about fishing fish in games. I have done it, you have done it. We as gamer’s have all been exposed to it at some point. I’ve tried a lot of games in my time and these pesky reward riddled mini games shows up all over the map. That being said, let’s take a closer look at some of these and see how various developers handled it and if the price was worth it.

Stardew Valley has a fairly decent and robust one. Which is also annoying as all hell. A town fellow hands you his old bamboo rod and leave the rest up to you. Equip some bait, apply force and throw the line into water. Wait for a bite and start reeling in, by tapping the button just fast enough to keep that fish inside the slider. Every now and then extra treasure appears as well. Yes it is definitely worth it.

Final Fantasy 15 and the boy band road trip also features one. Because why not flesh out Noctis skill set with something useful. Equip a rod, put on an alluring lure and make sure the fishing line has durability left. It’s one of those where the lure will be lost when the line snaps. Once the proper preparations has been completed, all I have to do is to aim at some fish silhouettes and let it go. Press the key a couple of times until one of the little buggers bite. Getting it to shore is then all about moving my rod in the same direction as the fish, whilst reeling in and reap the rewards of a new recipe.

The one in Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of time is my favorite one and no other game on this list comes close to that. Even if it resembles the one in Final Fantasy. Some desperate dude has a shop in the middle of Hyrule with Link as his only customer. I just have to pay the price, run around the place and pick a spot. Make some movement with the rod to attract a fish. Reel it in and move the stick a little to the left, to the right and backwards. Combined with a very dramatic camera made for quite an experience. Then turn in the biggest runt for a piece of heart. Or just find that hidden lure and go for that unique and very hard to get fish, which randomly appears. Only to get some extra dialogue for the trouble. Hylian Loach I believe its called.

Breath of fire 2 did it in a very annoying way, I dare say. I throw the line in and press a while hoping one of the fish is close enough to see  it and then bite. The problem is that I suffer from a limited amount of times I can press the key. Especially tricky with a treasure chest, since it will sink, resulting in a precise button timing challenge.

Pokemon has always been very simple in the approach. I place myself next to the water, hit a and wait for an exclamation mark before I click again. At lest you’ll never get a worm waterlogged boot on the hook.

World of Warcraft does it much the same way, but I have to actually click on the lure when things bite. Such as highly aggressive wagon wheels.

Meanwhile Black Desert made it into a directional key input challenge when I reacted to the prompt. Or I could just ignore it completely and let the game do the job for me, when I logged out. Yes almost every skill in the game can be set to afk farming.

All I’m saying is that some games does it well, whilst other botch up the mechanics and make the mini game boring.
That’s just several existing examples I can recall. Since I don’t play fishing simulators.

Tabletop Editorial: Yu-Gi-Oh! 2017 – New Rules / New Game Field!

Now, what I am about to say may shock all the duelists out there and I am also going all touch and go on my grammar right now to explain this but, here we go anyways!

With Yu-Gi-Oh! Arc-V coming to a end and Pendulums no longer being the main focus of the card game, Konami is switching things up with the new game mechanic called LINK and I am not referring to the Legend of Zelda on this one.

LINK monsters are blue colored monsters that are almost the same color as Ritual monsters but are not to be confused with them for two major reasons. The first reason being they have absolutely NO level and NO rank, so we can assume that they are immune to gravity bind and other such cards right from the get go.

The second reason being they have no way to go to defense mode, which means they are immune to cards like Book of Moon, This ultimately is a double edged sword since they can never be in defense mode that means you will always take damage if destroyed in battle with a stronger monster, but it also means immunity to cards that forces monsters into defense mode.

Their summoning method also is a bit more different. It act a bit like Synchro summoning where the player has to send monsters to the graveyard and the monsters in total sent to the graveyard is equal to the LINK monster you can bring out. So where Sychro Summoning is basic math of 2+4=6 for a level 6 Sychro Monster. LINK cards operate by a more simple means, I send two monsters so I can grab a LINK 2 monster as indicated by the bottom right hand corner of the LINK card.

I should mention that the LINK “level” and I use level loosely in this regard is where the defense power of a monster generally would be.

Now for the big news BIGGER than the LINK monster, but still equally important. That being the new Game Mechanic and overhaul of the complete dueling we have known up to this point.

The Extra Monster Zones, no longer can a player freely Sychro Summon, Xyz Summon, or Fusion Summon! But instead they must now compete for two spots above the monster zones called Extra Monster Zones. In these SHARED zones the players must fight for control because these two zones are the ONLY PLACE a player can Synchro, Xyz, Fusion, or LINK a monster.

The reason we can guess is Konami decided to finally fix the flood gate, but there is another reason. The LINK monsters as I mentioned earlier are the new Monster on the block, and these cards contain a bit of Tetra Master, you know from Final Fantasy? In their design, that being the Red Arrows indicated on their picture.

You see these red arrows are key to summoning, because where ever they point too. Those monster zones now act as Extra Monster zones and can Synchro, Xyz, or Fusion into those zones as well! So if you can get a LINK monster into the Extra Monster Zone you can being to mass summon again! Assuming you don’t get locked out by your opponent.

Also should mention that LINK monsters wherever their Red-Arrow points too, means those monsters in those zones are LINKED to it. Get it? Because LINK monster? But anyways, enjoy your new game mechanics, engage the rage quitting, and enjoy the new mat I designed myself, took me like eight hours!

Oh yea, Pendulum monsters cards now share the zone with Magic & Traps, if you play them as a Pendulum card you are then limited to using three Magic & Traps total.

Source: New Mechanics
Source: LINK Summoning

-Daniel Clatworthy

Tech Editorial: An Epic Move for the Unreal Engine

UnrealAfter 17 years and four generations, Epic Games has abandoned it’s pay-to-use policy on
the Unreal Engine.  This means that game developers and graphic designers can freely
download and install the product without the former $19 hit each month.

When designing games or other graphic-intense projects, there are hundreds of engines available.  Perhaps the most versatile is Maya, from which you can produce practically anything…games, architectural renderings, lawn furniture…you get the point.  But Maya is pricey:  $185 per month or $3675 to purchase outright for the 2015 edition.  Other engines
are completely free, notably Quake, but are not as powerful as their paid counterparts.

So what’s the catch?  The Unreal Engine (4th generation) is more powerful than
many other engines…and it’s free, right?  Well, almost.  If you go on to release a for-profit product designed with Unreal, you must pay a 5% royalty back to Epic Games.  This seems both nominal and fair.  Epic succeeds only if you succeed, and to proportional degree.

Will the free-to-use model draw more developers to the engine, or has Epic Games set an Unreal expectation?  We shall see.