Tag Archives: Game Design

PHYSICS! Why Unreal and Unity sucks

Physics!

Physical properties given to objects in the world the player and NPC’s intact with. Such as gravity, a force of nature that causes things to fall towards the ground. Our the ever present rag doll, the one where a corpse mysteriously turn into a boneless sea sponge. Which flop around the place when touched by any object with a hit box. Be, it bullets, people, explosions or a flying pebble. Non the less, the biggest offender is the one where I have to intact with boxes of any kind, especially in a first person game. The stock physics of a any 3D engine does bad things to stack-able objects.

Half-Life practically made movable 3d boxes a main stay in modern games. Especially the second installment of the series, which introduced the gravity gun. A weapon that picks up small things which I can fling in the face of danger. Such as saw blades and exploding barrels.

Anyhow, Half-Life 2 is built around the idea of a uniform physics engine, which calculate how anything not nailed down interact. Once I start flinging exploding canisters around, the Source engine calculates how nearby objects react to impact. The good thing though is that stacking objects is a fairly decent affair, I seldom have to deal with. Unlike a game such as Prey (The new one).

Where various upgrades allow me to move and throw almost any inanimate object I can get my grubby hands on. A real can of worms. Especially when throwing a heavy create hurts enemies hard, with a solid TWACK! That’s until I accidentally touch anything solid and instantly drops the thing I’m holding. God forbid I have to move a create out of a hallway. Putting a box upon a box, then jump on to said boxes to reach a ledge sounds easy right? Think again, I can’t count the frustration involved when two or more movable objects interact. It usually ends up with the things getting seizure. Not to mention how hard it is to aim a suitcase at an enemy. However the worst offender I’ve played recently is Hello Neighbor.

A game that’s in theory awesome as all heck. Where towers of crates can be stacked to reach new heights. Until i realize that cardboard boxes have virtually no structural integrity and is way to light. At lest they won’t spasm out like trashcans. It’s simply very hard to leave place one box onto another, without making a wobbly nightmare tower. I’ve also been knocked out by the physics engine, when it decided to rebound a box into my face. There is also a terrible sequence at a spooky mall, where five things go into the cart. I solved this by jumping onto the shopping cart and then dropping the items into it.

The Deus Ex series did the sensible thing at gave most objects a solid mass with some actual weight behind them. Essentially any box i place on a surface will stay that way. Even if I touch a corner.

Essentially I really loath the basic physics engine in both the Unreal engine and in Unity. Seriously do more hard coding instead of relying on a numerical value provided by the software. Especially when said game is built around such physics

Njål Sand

Haven Editorial: Gary Napper leave’s Sony

gary-napper-profileGary Napper one of the great game designers of our time has left Sony UK two months ago to pursue his gaming career to even new heights and has started a new job as Game Director at Supermassive games in Guildford and will be working on VR technologies.

What could this mean for the future of Supermassive games? Considering the highlights of Mr.Napper’s career to date it could mean an awful lot as he helped breath life into one of the scariest horror games to date known as Alien: Isolation and considering he is going to be working with virtual reality technology, its probably safe to say he will be putting people into the hospital from heart attacks in the near future.
Alien-Isolation-Launch-12
But it also brings out the question of why he is leaving Sony UK and honestly it is most likely to further his own career goals as a game designer. Supermassive games has been responsible for Until Dawn which has taken the Sony console world by storm for its amazing story telling as well as its overall design and with him signing onto a company such as Supermassive games we can honestly only expect good things to come from this.

Much like how when Hideo Kojima left Konami for Sony we all know only good things will come from it.  dontrun

As a fan of Gary Nappers work and horror games in general I look forward to see what new things Gary Napper will be bringing to the party to drive people insane and let the beads of sweat drop in fear from his future works as he leads a team to help develop and create new ways to scare people.  We can only imagine what evil’s he will create while working at Supermassive games and with the way things are going he may create the future successor to the Silent Hill style of games because we all know Konami will never have a good solid plan in horror genre games.Client_logos_0000s_0026_supermassivegames.pngBut whatever the future holds we hope Gary Napper will continue to shine as one of the great game developers of our time and continue to make really amazing games and I hope that he continues to create some amazing triple A titles that will continue to blow the minds off everyone who plays his games. As well as those who get to watch people playing his games from let’s plays online.

-Daniel Clatworthy-
Source: The man’s twitter.

Pardon the grammar My editor isn’t around right now

Haven Review: RPG Maker MV

First up is our disclaimer. We received this game for review purposes only, and as such all opinions in this review are our own. No money has been exchanged for this review.

RPG Maker MV is a software that has been used to make many great titles such as To the MoonA Bird’s Story and various others. It’s had a good run on Steam Greenlight as well, along with a lot of half-baked indie titles that many “designers” have put zero effort into making. You know who I’m talking about.carousel-logo-rpg-maker-mvBut despite all this, the software remains as versatile as ever with its newest iteration to replace RPG Maker VX Ace. The previous version has actually helped us start a project for our very first game called Chronicles: Heroes of the First Light and has been easy to learn. I wouldn’t go as far as to say it’s so simple a child could use it (as they advertise).

However RPG Maker VX Ace has been outdated for a while now, and has been limited by an old coding language called Ruby. A big issue is the platform. It’s strictly for Windows; no support for any other platform including mobile gaming. But as the times change so does the software, and the newest version comes forth.rpg-maker-mv-08-07-15-3

RPG Maker MV, now cleanly coded in Javascript, gives game developers a new level of versatility and a lot more stability. Games can be designed in glorious 1080p or higher resolution and ported not only to Windows, but also to Android and Apple products.  There is even a plugin written just for RPG Maker VX Ace, which will allow people to port their previous games into the new engine to help bring their titles to other platforms.

The learning curve for RPG Maker MV though is about the same as in previous versions, where you could load a person’s script and use it in your title. That hasn’t changed, except now it is just a more familiar coding language used by a lot of people. As always too, the RPG Maker community is incredibly helpful. With the new software being out only a few months, a wave of new plugins has already started to arrive; making game developing easier for newcomers and for those wanting to port their title.

Our own title has already been ported to the new engine and is progressing along smoothly. New features included in this iteration of RPG Maker now let players choose to include side battlers (as in Final Fantasy) or exclude them (as per Phantasy Star). This new setup eliminates the need for a lot of convoluted plugins and makes it easier for people to design a game they want.Screenshot 2015-11-09 04.39.59

Other new features include support for higher quality .ogg audio files. Although being honest here, I didn’t even realize MP3s were considered low quality until our composer questioned me about it. One of the new features I am trying to come to terms with is a plugin-enabled script. Back in the original software, each script we loaded had to have some degree of confusing instructions to follow which made things hard to understand. But in MV this is replaced with the Plugin command. Simply placing the desired effect into the Plugin command in the events section will enable the plugin.

All in all though, I simply love the new RPG Maker being able to use high quality images and audio. I can only hope the games we review down the line will be more gems to put into the chest of great works. Although I may not care for a lot of RPG Maker games (due to lack of designer effort), I know that someone out there will be making the next best titles with this software. I look forward to playing them.

-Daniel Clatworthy-