Tabletop Editorial: Cards “For” Humanity?

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Cards Against Humanity (CAH) has quickly gone from a little-known indie game to a worldwide phenomenon in a few short years. It’s a vulgar card game, meant to combine horrible things with horrible ideas. The company behind the game has done little to hide their image as the rudest game developers around. They’ve even gone as far and to stage several public stunts to enhance this image. For Black Friday, 2014 CAH sold on their site the $6.00 Bullshit Expansion. Inside the box however was not more cards to add to your game, but something far stinkier: literal bullshit, like from a bull’s butt. In the mail 30,000 people got a small box containing a good portion of poop. There wasn’t anything else. No secret cards, no message, no nothing…except poop. In 2015 CAH came back with another Black Friday “sale.” This time the asking price was $5.00 (a discount!), but instead of getting anything nearly as exciting as poo, people got jack all. The site clearly stated that your $5.00 wouldn’t get you anything. You were just giving it to the company. They made over $71,000 doing this. What assholes. However, they are lovable assholes. Cards Against Humanity has been known to sponsor some great charity work. They’ve donated to organizations like Worldbuilders, Donorschoose.org, and the Chicago Design Museum.

The people at Cards Against Humanity are ironically pretty active humanitarians. And the money they got from selling shit? It all went to Heifer International, an organization that brings cows and other livestock to villages around the world that are in need. The money they got for absolutely nothing? Well, they kept all that. No one is perfect, but doing something like setting up a $500,000 scholarship for women looking to get into science deserves a little windfall…especially after what they’ve continued to do.

Most recently, the CAH folks wanted to do something nice for the factory workers in China who print and assemble their product. The workers have had to deal with the substantial growth just as much as the rest of the company. Cards Against Humanity wanted to give them something that they all desperately needed: a paid vacation. In China, paid vacations are pretty rare, and there really wasn’t a formal way of doing it. So CAH did the next best thing; they paid for the factory to run at 100% capacity for a week, while producing nothing. During this time, everyone in the factory received full pay but were able to see their families and spend a little time for themselves over the holidays. Cards Against Humanity loves to look edgy and rude, just like their game. But deep down they’re all wonderful people.

-Jordan Kamm-